Services

At Dermatology Care Center in Maple Valley, WA, we take the time to listen carefully to our patients’ concerns and provide a thorough skin examination, allowing us to develop a personalized treatment plan that is the best fit for each patient.Dr. Gee has lived in every region of the United States and in many other countries, and he has seen patients from all over the world, especially during his over 30 years in the U.S. Air Force which included many deployments and humanitarian missions. His experience as a teaching professor with the UW Medical Center and UCSF Medical Center Dermatology Departments also contributes to his vast experience and knowledge in dermatology. Whether you have a rare or common skin condition, Dr. Gee has the expertise and compassion to help you find a treatment solution that satisfies your concerns.

 

Skin Cancer & Pre-Cancer

Basal Cell Cancer

The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell cancer (BCC), and it is usually found on the areas of the body that are most vulnerable to the sun, including the head, hands and neck. However, basal cell cancer can be found anywhere on the body.

Signs/Symptoms

  • A raised growth with a flattened center and visible blood vessels, which gradually grows and easily bleeds
  • A patch of scaly, shiny, pink or red skin that may look like dry skin or eczema
  • A white, yellow, or skin-colored growth that is waxy and may be confused for a scar

Care Tips

  • It is very important to treat skin cancer early because this is when it is most curable. If left untreated, BCC can continue to spread to surrounding areas and cause tissue or organ destruction and eventually can become life-threatening.
  • Protect your skin with a wide brim hat and protective clothing and use sunscreen of at least SPF 30 on any exposed skin whenever outdoors.
  • For early detection of skin cancer it is recommended to have an annual skin exam by a dermatologist and perform a monthly skin self-exam.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resources

Squamous Cell Cancer

Squamous cell cancer (SCC) generally forms on areas most exposed to the sun, but it can also be found anywhere on the body, including the lips, hands, ears, face, arms, legs, or even the genitals or inside the mouth.

Symptoms

  • A rough bump that grows into a dome
  • A crusty, bleeding bump
  • A sore that won’t go away or keeps coming back
  • A scaly, red patch that gradually grows

Care Tips

  • It is very important to treat skin cancer early because this is when it is most curable. When SCC is caught early, it is highly treatable, however if left untreated SCC does have the capability to metastasize to your lymph nodes or internal organs and become life threatening.
  • Protect your skin with a wide brim hat and protective clothing and use sunscreen of at least SPF 30 on any exposed skin whenever outdoors.
  • For early detection of skin cancer it is recommended to have an annual skin exam by a dermatologist and perform a monthly skin self-exam.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resources

Melanoma

Melanoma is the most deadly skin cancer. But when it is caught and diagnosed early, it is treatable. It generally forms on areas most exposed to the sun, but it can also be found anywhere on the body, including the lips, hands, ears, face, arms, legs, genitals, inside the mouth, or under fingernails / toenails.

It is important to perform monthly skin self-exams and know what to look for. Follow the ABCDEs for the signs of melanoma:

  • Asymmetry
  • Border (irregular)
  • Color (varied throughout the spot)
  • Diameter (larger than 6mm)
  • Evolving (into a different size, color or shape)

Symptoms

  • An existing mole that begins to change in shape or color
  • The appearance of a new patch or growth on the skin
  • A spot that looks similar to an age spot or freckle that is changing
  • A dark spot or streak under a nail
  • An area of thick skin that gradually grows and may be confused for a scar

Care Tips

  • It is very important to treat skin cancer early, especially Melanoma, because this is when it is most curable. When Melanoma is caught early, it is highly treatable, however if left untreated Melanoma does have the capability to metastasize to your lymph nodes or internal organs and become life threatening.
  • Protect your skin with a wide brim hat and protective clothing and use sunscreen of at least SPF 30 on any exposed skin whenever outdoors.
  • For early detection of skin cancer it is recommended to have an annual skin exam by a dermatologist and perform a monthly skin self-exam.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resources

Actinic Keratosis, “Pre-Cancer”

Actinic Keratosis, or AK, is a form of pre-cancer that develops when the skin has been over-exposed to ultraviolet rays, either through sun exposure or indoor tanning. Most people with AK have more than one. AKs should be treated early before they develop into skin cancer. They can be prevented by wearing sunscreen, avoiding sun exposure and indoor tanning.

Symptoms

  • A rough patch or growth on the skin that is painful to the touch
  • Skin that itches or burns
  • Dehydrated lips

Care Tips

  • It is important to treat AKs early. When AKs do turn into a skin cancer, it is usually the Squamous Cell variety, which does have the capability to metastasize to lymph nodes or internal organs and become life-threatening. AKs can appear, disappear, and reappear again. You should visit a dermatologist even if your AK seems to have disappeared.
  • Protect your skin with a wide brim hat and protective clothing and use sunscreen of at least SPF 30 on any exposed skin whenever outdoors.
  • For early detection of skin cancer it is recommended to have an annual skin exam by a dermatologist and perform a monthly skin self-exam.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resources


 

Bumps & Growths

Birthmarks

A birthmark is a bump, spot, or patch on the skin that appears at birth or within a short time after birth.

Signs/Symptoms

The birthmark can be flat or raised, large or small, and can be any sort of color, from brown to bruise-colored. Birthmarks are very common. Some disappear, and some remain on the skin. Most birthmarks are not dangerous to your child, but it is still a good idea to have a dermatologist look at the mark, especially if it is changing.

Care Tips

  • Protect your child’s skin with a wide brim hat and protective clothing and use sunscreen of at least SPF 30 on any exposed skin whenever outdoors.
  • For early detection of skin cancer it is recommended to have an annual skin exam by a dermatologist and perform a monthly skin self-exam.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Keratosis Pilaris

Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a genetically determined harmless condition and considered to be a normal variation of the skin, occurring in about 40% of the general population globally.

Signs/Symptoms

Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a condition in which you have tiny bumps on the skin, usually on the upper arms and thighs that look similar to goosebumps. This common condition is caused by a thickening of skin cells around the pores/hair follicles of the skin.

Care Tips

  • Because this is not a skin abnormality and is genetically driven, there is no actual treatment needed.
  • Gentle skin care can help, which includes: at least twice daily moisturizing, avoid long hot showers/baths, avoid use of scrubbing devices (wash clothes/puffs/brushes/loofahs), use fragrance & dye free options for your soap, moisturizer, laundry detergent, and any other personal and household products.
  • If your skin condition changes, it may be important to have it evaluated by a dermatologist.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Moles

Most adults have moles. They usually form during childhood or young adulthood. The average person may have a couple dozen moles and others may have many more.

Signs/Symptoms

Moles often grow slowly as you grow, and usually this is not a sign of anything serious. However, when an adult has a new mole or notices new changes in a mole, it can be a sign of melanoma. If you notice a mole is changing in size/shape/color, bleeding or itching, you should see a dermatologist right away. A mole should have a regular border (not wavy or angled), be one color, rounded, either flat or slightly raised, and not changing.

It is important to perform monthly skin self-exams and know what to look for. Follow the ABCDEs for the signs of melanoma:

  • Asymmetry
  • Border (irregular)
  • Color (varied throughout the spot)
  • Diameter (larger than 6mm)
  • Evolving (into a different size, color or shape)

Care Tips

  • Protect your skin with a wide brim hat and protective clothing and use sunscreen of at least SPF 30 on any exposed skin whenever outdoors.
  • For early detection of skin cancer it is recommended to have an annual skin exam by a dermatologist and perform a monthly skin self-exam.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resources

Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic Keratosis (SK) is a very common skin growth that often occurs under areas of restrictive clothing or rubbing, but they can occur anywhere on the body.

Signs/Symptoms

Seborrheic keratosis begins as small bumps and grows into a warty area. It often looks waxy or shiny, and is most commonly brown in color, but can be various shades of skin tone, tan, yellow, dark brown or black. This condition can develop anywhere on the body, except the palms and soles of the feet. You should visit a dermatologist if your seborrheic keratosis:

  • Quickly increases in size
  • Bleeds
  • Becomes black
  • Suddenly appears, along with other new skin growths
  • Is dry, scaly or flat
  • Is easily irritated
  • You want it removed

It is possible for SKs to sometimes look suspicious for a Melanoma skin cancer, which is the most dangerous type. It is important to perform monthly skin self-exams and know what to look for. Follow the ABCDEs for the signs of melanoma:

  • Asymmetry
  • Border (irregular)
  • Color (varied throughout the spot)
  • Diameter (larger than 6mm)
  • Evolving (into a different size, color or shape)

Care Tips

  • For early detection of skin cancer it is recommended to have an annual skin exam by a dermatologist and perform a monthly skin self-exam.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resources


 

Contagious Skin Diseases

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is a contagious fungal infection that usually is caused by going barefoot in a public wet area, such as public showers.

Signs/Symptoms

You may experience flaky, itchy, sometimes painful cracking skin between toes and on the bottom or sides of the foot.

Care Tips

  • This condition is treatable but can easily recur. Persistent cases may need evaluation and treatment by a dermatologist.
  • To prevent athlete’s foot, keep your feet as dry as possible at all times. Wear flip-flops in gyms, shower areas, locker rooms, hotel rooms, and pools. Wash your feet every day and dry them immediately after, and wear moisture-wicking socks.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Cold Sores (Herpes Simplex)

Cold sores are a result of the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and can recur any time.

Signs/Symptoms

They occur as blisters that break out on or around the lips. They generally are not serious, although they are contagious until they have scabbed.

Care Tips

  • Cold sores are contagious. Avoid kissing people and other intimate contact, and don’t share personal items or food and beverages that have been around your mouth.
  • Wash your hands after touching the cold sore.
  • Over-the-counter cold sore medicines can help cold sores disappear more quickly.
  • You should visit a dermatologist if you have a weakened immune system, cold sores close to the eyes, are frequently getting cold sores, or have a cold sore that lasts for over two weeks.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Genital Herpes

Genital herpes, caused by the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), is a sexually transmitted disease (STD), and can recur any time. Some people with herpes never get sores, so they don’t know they have it, but they can be a carrier.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Genital herpes often shows up as painful blisters with some surrounding redness and turns into ulcers. It can be on the external genital areas, buttocks, and in between. In women it can also occur in the vagina.
  • Sometimes fever, swelling, painful urination or discharge can be experienced.

Care Tips

  • Genital herpes is contagious. If you have genital sores, you should avoid having any form of sex with partners who don’t have sores until a few days after the sores have disappeared.
  • When you don’t have sores, wearing a condom can prevent spreading herpes.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Genital Warts

Genital warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

Signs/Symptoms

  • Genital warts can occur on the external genital areas, buttocks, and in between. In women it can also occur in the vagina.
  • Sometimes genital warts can carry a type of HPV that can cause life-threatening cervical cancer in women.
  • They can appear pink or skin colored with smooth, rough, or bumpy surface.

Care Tips

  • Genital warts should be medically evaluated and treated as soon as you discover them to avoid spreading on your body and potential transmission to others.
  • All females with potential contact should be evaluated by an ob/gyn type of medical provider immediately.
  • An HPV vaccine can prevent you from getting genital warts.
  • You should also use a condom and avoid having sex with many partners.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Impetigo

Impetigo is not a serious condition, although it is very contagious bacterial infection, usually of staph or strep type. It is common in children and is caused by skin-to-skin contact with someone with impetigo, or by touching something that has impetigo-causing bacteria on it.

Signs/Symptoms

  • The bacteria can enter broken skin, resulting in honey-yellowish colored crusted, sores.
  • Often occurs on face (especially around nose/mouth), arms and legs, but can occur anywhere on the body.

Care Tips

  • Impetigo is contagious and should be medically treated to reduce the risk of the infection traveling further into the skin and to others.
  • If you have impetigo, you should avoid skin-to-skin contact with other people, avoid sharing personal items, avoid touching sores, keep the sores disinfected and covered, wash your hands often, and wash clothing and other fabrics that have been in contact with the sores.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Molluscum Contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum is a contagious benign virus that causes small bumps on the skin and is most common in children. It can occur in adults as a sexually transmitted disease (STD).

Signs/Symptoms

  • The bacteria can enter broken skin, resulting in honey-yellowish colored crusted, sores.
  • Often occurs on face (especially around nose/mouth), arms and legs, but can occur anywhere on the body.

Care Tips

  • Spread can occur by direct contact or even by touching skin with infected towels, clothing, and washcloths/puff/brushes/loofahs. Change towels/linens frequently and avoid using any scrubbing devices in the bath/shower.
  • Medical treatment is recommended to prevent further spread to other areas on the body or to other individuals.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Nail Fungus

Signs/Symptoms

  • Onychomycosis fungal infection can occur on finger or toenails and may also involve the nailbed and surrounding areas.
  • Some people may experience pain or other symptoms and color changes or deformities of the involved nails.

Care Tips

  • This condition tends to be chronic and even when treated may recur easily.
  • A longitudinal dark irregular line or streak in a finger or toe nail is a dangerous warning sign for Melanoma, a potentially life-threatening type of skin cancer, and should be evaluated immediately.
  • This condition can lead to more serious infections in other body areas if you have diabetes or immunosuppression. Close ongoing follow-up with your primary care provider is recommended.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Ringworm (Tinea Corporis)

Ringworm is a fungal infection of the skin that can appear in many different ways, often ring-like, on any part of the body.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Can occur as pink/red or dark patches that are flat with a raised flaky border, and they gradually increase in size, sometimes with central clear areas, and spread onto different areas of the skin.
  • May be intensely itchy.

Care Tips

  • Ringworm is contagious and can be cured with treatment.
  • To prevent the spread of ringworm, you should wash your hands after touching an area with ringworm and keep these areas as clean and dry as possible.
  • Pets can also carry ringworm, which can spread to humans. Click here to read an article from The Centers for Disease Control for information on how to respond if your pet has ringworm.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Scabies

Scabies is a very contagious and bothersome benign infestation of the skin by a mite (Sarcoptes scabiei hominis).

Signs/Symptoms

  • May appear as pink/red bumps, blisters, or scabs/crusts anywhere on the skin, especially wrists, feet, finger and toe webs, around umbilicus and waistline, genitals and buttocks.
  • Usually intensely itchy.

Care Tips

  • If you think you have scabies, it is essential to visit your primary care doctor, urgent care, or dermatologist and closely follow their recommended treatment.
  • Because scabies is very contagious, people who you have been in contact with will also need to be treated.
  • There is no need to be embarrassed if you have scabies; anyone can get it, no matter their hygiene level.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Shingles (Herpes Zoster)

If you had chickenpox as a child, you are at risk of getting shingles. Shingles (Herpes Zoster) is caused by the awakening of the dormant chicken pox virus (Varicella-Zoster Virus) that remains in someone’s body after having chicken pox.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Red area with clusters of small blisters in a small segment of the skin on only one side of the body.
  • Often very painful
  • May have local lymph node swelling
  • May be preceded by fever, loss of energy and/or appetite

Care Tips

  • This condition is benign and self-limited and symptoms can be lessened if care is sought early, although quick cure is usually not possible due to the viral nature.
  • If you are 50 years old or older, you should receive the shingles vaccine to prevent this infection.
  • If you have shingles, loose clothing, covering the rash with bandages, calamine lotion, ice packs and cool water can help provide pain relief.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Warts (Non-genital)

Non-genital warts, also known as verruca vulgaris, are non-cancerous bumps that grow on the skin due to the human papillomavirus (HPV) and are contagious.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Can occur on any part of the body and can be very small or quite large.
  • May appear as thickened bumps with a rough or flat surface, and some types have tiny finger-like projections.
  • Some skin cancers can mimic warts so it is a good idea to have them evaluated by a dermatologist.

Care Tips

  • They can easily be spread to other areas on the body and to others and early medical treatment is recommended.
  • If you suspect the wart may be cancerous, or the wart is spreading, painful or itchy, or is on your face, fingers or genitals, you should visit a dermatologist.
  • Avoid picking at warts as this can cause spread to areas beneath your finger nails and may be very painful and difficult to treat.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

 

Eczema/Dermatitis

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin condition otherwise known as eczema. Babies often develop eczema, which causes itching and dry skin. It can show up for the first time at any age however, and can easily recur, especially if the skin is allowed to become dry.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Dry, itchy, pink/red, often flaky eruptions on the skin, especially creases of elbows and behind knees, but can occur anywhere on the body.
  • Often associated with a personal or family history of asthma, hay fever, or seasonal nose/sinus allergies.

Care Tips

  • Make sure you moisturize your child’s skin and avoid scrubbing or using hot water when bathing your child.
  • Make sure your home is at a comfortable temperature and humidity to avoid drying out the skin.
  • Early medical care can be helpful for difficult cases to avoid repeated scratching that can exacerbate the condition and lead to infections.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resource

Contact Dermatitis & Nickel Allergy

This type of eczema can be caused by poison ivy, contact with nickel, makeup, jewelry, latex and diapers, and many other irritants/chemicals found in everyday products and foods.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Flaky, pink/red skin eruptions, sometimes with small blisters or swelling.
  • May occur in the shape of the offending agent that came in contact with the skin

Care Tips

  • If the irritation doesn’t go away quickly on its own, a dermatologist can help.
  • Discovering what is causing the rash and limiting contact with the irritant can be important for clearing up contact dermatitis.
  • Many people have a nickel allergy and if you suspect this, avoid wearing jewelry and clothing with nickel.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

 

Rashes

When To See A Dermatologist Or Go To The Emergency Room

Call 911 or Go to the Emergency Room/Urgent Care if:

  • You have a fever with the rash
  • The rash is over most of your body
  • The rash is accompanied by any reactions in your mouth, around your eyes, or genital areas
  • The rash occurs suddenly and spreads quickly
  • If there is any blister formation with the rash
  • If the rash is painful
  • If the rash appears to have spreading redness, pain, swelling, pus, fever or any indication of infection

For Rashes Without One of the Above Emergency Indicators:

  • It is important to have early medical treatment by a dermatologist to avoid allowing the rash to spread or worsen which might make it harder to treat.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Cellulitis

Cellulitis is a bacterial infection of the skin and surrounding tissues that can occur anywhere on the body, and usually on a leg or foot in adults and often the face/neck area in children.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Cellulitis causes red, swollen, warm and painful skin.
  • It can be accompanied by fever.
  • When the infection is more serious, the skin may also become blistered, and you may experience increased heart rate or decreased blood pressure.
  • It can sometimes progress to necrotizing fasciitis, which is the “flesh-eating” type of bacterial infection sometimes reported in the news media and can be life-threatening if not treated early.

Care Tips

  • Treatment is mainly with oral antibiotics and sometimes IV antibiotics may be required.
  • It is important to have early medical treatment of cellulitis, especially to prevent the possibility for progression to the potentially life-threatening “flesh eating” type of infection.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Lichen Planus

The cause of Lichen Planus is not fully understood, but it is thought to be a malfunctioning of the body’s immune system.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Lichen planus causes bumps, often polygonal shaped, on the skin that are shiny and red-purple in color.
  • These bumps may itch or hurt and can create thick plaques on the skin.
  • Lichen planus can also form inside the mouth, on the nails, or very rarely on the scalp.

Care Tips

  • Lichen Planus is usually self-limited and not dangerous, but can be very annoying. A dermatologist can help you with treating the symptoms of lichen planus, although it can persist for extended periods even with treatment.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Lupus

Lupus is a complex disease involving abnormalities of the body’s immune system that are still not fully understood. It can appear on the skin in many different ways both with and without the internal (systemic) type of lupus.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Lupus can cause red swollen type skin rashes, scaly patches, or sores on different parts of the body.
  • It has many forms and often include sun-exposed areas, especially the face, but can occur all over the body, including sometimes the mouth, tongue, and gums.
  • Blisters can be seen in more severe forms and indicate a possible emergency.

Care Tips

  • Call 911 or go to the Emergency Room / Urgent Care if a rash is accompanied by fever, blisters, or has any reactions in your mouth, around your eyes, or genital areas or if it has rapid onset or covers most of your body.
  • For non-emergency Lupus skin disease a dermatologist can help manage this condition and it’s symptoms but it can be chronic or recurrent.
  • Sun protection and avoidance is very important to prevent flare-ups.
  • A rheumatologist and other specialists may need to be part of the treatment team depending on the type of lupus and extent of body involvement.
  • Lupus increases a person’s risk for skin cancer and is another reason for obtaining a dermatology evaluation early.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resource

Pityriasis Rosea

Pityriasis Rosea (PR) is a common benign skin condition that is self-limited and usually goes away in a few weeks.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Often starts with a larger red/pink flaky ring-shaped skin eruption called the “herald patch.”
  • Later followed by many smaller similar bumps that may be scattered over the torso and extremities.
  • Can be itchy
  • Sometimes occurs after an upper respiratory/viral infection

Care Tips

  • Although this rash is self-limited, it can be important to get medical treatment early to avoid aggravating symptoms like intense itching that can lead to scratching and skin infections.
  • It is also important to have an expert evaluation to make sure this is not a more dangerous form of skin disease.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

 

Flaky Skin Disorders

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a very common skin condition that is like an advanced inflammatory form of dandruff. Although the cause is not fully understood it is thought to be a malfunctioning of the body’s immune system and can affect every ethnicity with typical onset age in the 30’s or 40’s, but can occur in infants (cradle) and elderly as well.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Seborrheic dermatitis causes a swollen, greasy, reddish, scaly rash that may itch.
  • In adults it can occur on the scalp, around the hairline, ears, eyebrows, between the nose and cheeks, chin, and sometimes the chest or any other body area.
  • Some infants develop cradle cap, which is a form of seborrheic dermatitis that forms on the scalp. Seborrheic dermatitis can also form around the diaper.

Care Tips

  • This is not a dangerous condition and will generally go away when the baby reaches six months to one year old. In adults, the condition can disappear and come back regularly. Baby shampoo for babies and dandruff shampoo for adults can help reduce the rash. If this does not work, a dermatologist can help.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a condition in which a person’s skin cells grow too quickly, and they collect into thick, rough patches on the skin. Psoriasis is a chronic condition, but it is not contagious; it is genetic.

Signs/Symptoms

  • There are many forms of psoriasis with the most common involving skin areas such as the scalp, knees, elbows, lower back/upper buttock, and genitals.
  • Psoriasis typically looks like salmon colored thickened plaques on the skin with a silvery-white flakiness on top.

Care Tips

  • Although there is still no cure for psoriasis, it can be controlled with ongoing treatment.
  • Learning more about psoriasis, taking care of yourself, and visiting a dermatologist can all help in successfully managing the condition.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resource


 

Acne & Rosacea

Acne

Acne is not just a skin condition that occurs during the teenage years. It can persist into the adult years as well. It is caused by genetic and hormonal influences.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Acne lesions can take many forms including common early forms of whiteheads/blackheads and progression to red bumps with or without inflammation, and sometimes pustules, deeper nodules, cysts or scarring.

Care Tips

  • While it may be difficult to completely clear acne until Mother Nature’s genetic program for you says you’re done with acne, there are many treatments for keeping acne under control.
  • A gentle, proper skin care regimen can help clear up and prevent acne.
  • Avoid squeezing, picking or irritating pimples as can cause scarring, and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Avoid contact of hands, hair, restrictive clothing/equipment, and any cosmetic or hair products with acne prone skin as this can cause flare-ups.
  • However, if you are struggling to get rid of your acne, or it is affecting your self-esteem, you should visit a dermatologist.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common benign but recurrent skin condition of flushing of facial skin and sometimes acne-like breakouts.

Signs/Symptoms

  • If you blush frequently and notice that the redness affects the rest of the face and potentially other parts of the body, you may have rosacea.
  • Rosacea can also cause breakouts, acne-like bumps, and reddened eyes.

Care Tips

  • Although there is currently no permanent cure for rosacea, a dermatologist can help determine what causes your rosacea and develop avoidance techniques, prescribe medications for control and recommend gentle skin care products that won’t irritate your skin.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resources


 

Color Problems

Melasma

Melasma is a common benign skin problem affecting mostly women. The exact cause is unknown although it thought to be influenced by hormonal changes, especially during or after pregnancy. Some medications may also cause it.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Gray-brown flat darkened “blotchy” areas of the skin, usually on the cheeks, but may also occur on forehead, nose, upper lip, and sometimes on neck or forearms.

Care Tips

  • Although melasma cannot be permanently cured, it can be controlled with medical treatment and a dermatologist can help develop an appropriate treatment plan.
  • Sun protection and avoidance is highly advised because sun exposure will typically cause flare-ups or recurrence of melasma.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Tinea Versicolor

Tinea Versicolor is a common benign fungal (yeast) infection in the uppermost layers of the skin, occurring more frequently in warm climates. Some people are naturally more susceptible to this infection than others and in these people it may regularly recur even after treatment.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Tinea versicolor shows up as variations of the color of the skin.
  • Lighter skin types may notice brownish-pink or tan colored areas.
  • Darker skin types may see lighter or darker flat areas on the skin.
  • There may be a very fine flakiness to the skin, especially when scratched.
  • The color difference may be more noticeable during sunny months because the areas involved will not tan.
  • It may be itchy but this condition usually has no symptoms.

Care Tips

  • Tinea versicolor can usually be successfully treated with topical and/or oral antifungal medications. Recurrence is a possibility if you are susceptible, and this condition can run in families.
  • A dermatologist can help develop the best treatment plan for you and to make sure this is not a more serious skin condition.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Vitiligo

Vitiligo is a malfunction of the immune system that causes the pigment producing cells of the skin to stop making pigment and results in a complete loss of skin color in the areas affected. The cause is unknown but it is thought to have both genetic and nongenetic influences.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Very white small or large flat areas on the skin.
  • Typically found on face/neck, arms, hands/fingers, feet, but can occur anywhere on the body.
  • It can even affect hair color, the eyes, or the mouth.

Care Tips

  • It is not contagious or a threat to your health, but it can affect your self-esteem, especially because it is usually a permanent condition.
  • A dermatologist can help with medical treatments that may help reverse the depigmentation. It is possible the condition can recur at any time, even after treatment.
  • Using sun protection is important as affected areas are at higher risk for skin cancer.
  • Using self-tanning products or makeup can reduce the appearance of vitiligo.
  • Finding others with the condition and learning more about it can also be helpful.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

Resources

Acanthosis Nigricans

Acanthosis Nigricans (AN) is a condition of skin darkening that may be caused by genetics, weight, certain medications, or a malfunction in the body’s immune system which may also affect insulin resistance,. In more rare cases it may be associated with internal malignancies. The exact cause is still not fully understood, and is not the same in every individual.

Signs/Symptoms

  • Areas of skin affected are typically around the neck, underarms, and groin, but may appear anywhere on the body.
  • The skin becomes darker, thickened, and may feel like velvet.

Care Tips

  • See your primary care provider (PCP) for an evaluation immediately if you have this condition because certain forms of AN, especially those that appear rapidly, may be associated with an internal malignancy. Your PCP will likely also want to check your insulin levels and risks for diabetes.
  • After your PCP addresses any internal causes for this condition, a dermatologist can help evaluate your skin and develop a treatment plan that may help control this condition, even though a complete cure may not be possible, especially if there are genetic influences.
  • Do not delay seeking dermatology evaluation and treatment if you have any new or changing skin growths or conditions. For an appointment call: 425-201-5117 or register online at our patient portal and request an appointment—just click here.

For more information about any of these skin conditions, or to schedule an appointment for diagnosis and treatment, contact Dr. Gee today today at 425-201-5117 .